Ramblings of an old-school software developer, father, and woodworker.

Recent Posts

Frontend and Backend: What's so different?
Thoughts on Development Domains

We Are All 10x Developers
What a 10x developer really is, and why sometimes we’re all 10x.

The Parable of the Two Programmers
A classic anecdote about skill vs. experience in programming.

How to Debug Anything
If you’re having trouble fixing anything, try one of these strategies.

RealMensch

last update:

For the first time, I’m trying to put a lot of effort into social media. I’m posting on Facebook (which cross-posts to Twitter). I’ve updated my company blog. I’m posting on Google Plus, even, and starting to dig into other sites relevant to the game that I’m putting together. I’ve been on this project almost full time for days now, and not one line of code has been written for it.

Project in the works

After months of spending time at others’ beck and call, working on various consulting gigs, I’m finally back in the development chair. At least almost. I’ve spent over nine months working on contracts, refilling the war chest. I sold my house and bought a cheaper one to get out from under a mortgage, so I’d be better able to pursue my own projects for longer without active income. And I’m finally, finally pursuing my “dream game” project.

Edit on Jan 24, 2012: A new Lua binding generator now takes top honors. I write game libraries first, and then games. It’s in my blood, or at least I’m in a rut. One way or another, it’s a habit that I find hard to break. And I’ve become a major fan of the programming language Lua; it’s fast and small and easy to bind to C or C++. Or so I thought…

A while ago I wrote about the troubles I was having with Lua bindings. Some were too heavy, some were too flaky. And after spending all that time reviewing them, I ran out of time and had to pick one – and I made the mistake of picking a flaky one, with the result being that I have wasted a LOT of time over the past year fixing corner cases and issues with it.

On TechDirt today there is an article claiming that bloggers should be protected as journalists. But I tend to be more in agreement with Ars Technica on the topic, which notes the judge referenced more criteria than whether the “blogger” calls herself a journalist. As much as I want serious bloggers to be covered by shield laws, I do think that there should be some discretion into who is considered a journalist.

I’ve been seeing bloggers panic about an alleged change with the new Google Android Developer Agreement. As was pointed out by one developer on Twitter, the text hasn’t changed. So what has changed that they want us to agree to? I decided I wanted to find out. Looking at the page in archive.org (thanks for the idea, Nathan), I compared the version from May 1, 2011 with the one available on the site today.

Today we were enjoying a nice, warm day that made it seem like summer hadn’t really ended…until about 2:16PM, when all of a sudden someone turned on the wind, which started gusting at over 30MPH, and which brought with it some clouds and fog that spattered rain all over us. So much for summer. :) In other news, they had to remove a mountain lion from a student apartment complex. Apparently it was pretty scared of the students who were standing up on a bridge nearby to take pictures of it.

As many people know now, web sites can put small packets of information on your computer, called “cookies,” and they do this for various reasons. Sometimes it’s to save your password on a site, but sometimes it’s to track ads you’ve seen and products you’ve purchased. A lot of people seem to want to know how to see what “cookies” have been placed on their computer, and what pages have placed the cookies there.

RIP Nokia

The big news today is that Nokia and Microsoft have created a partnership, and that Nokia will start selling smartphones based on Windows Phone 7 (WP7). As an app developer, I think this is a terrible idea. Having to support two phone ecosystems is annoying enough. If WP7 actually does manage to get any market share to speak of, I will have to consider porting my games to a third platform – one that, at the moment, doesn’t support native development, so instead of just having one set of source code that I can port to multiple devices, it would take almost a complete rewrite.

Ahh, the Android build process is always fun. In my previous blog post I talked about how huge LuaBind and OOLua++ were. Apparently I needed to do a clean build, though, because now I’m getting different numbers I’m an idiot. The new numbers I was seeing was because I was reading their sizes wrong. Divided by two. I’ve updated the incorrect numbers in the previous blog entry. I looked at it again because, frankly, I didn’t believe my own numbers.