Ramblings of a coder.

RealMensch

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Goodbye, Lua

As of May 19th, I've unsubscribed from the Lua mailing list. Thus ends an era. For years I have been a strong proponent of Lua. I've used it in my games, and I've used it in servers with Nginx. I've used Lua to write command line tools, and I've used it to write extensions for existing games. Lua is a great language to play with for a number of reasons. The syntax is easy to learn and somewhat forgiving.

I was given a review copy of the Direct 3D Rendering Cookbook by the publisher, Packt, and over the course of a couple of plane flights I’ve had a chance to look it over. As a basic introduction to how DirectX 11 usage, it seems great so far. I’ve used previous versions of DirectX, so I can’t comment on how clear it would be for a complete beginner, but for someone who already knows the basics it was certainly very easy to follow.

An article on Penny Arcade talks a bit about why Days of Wonder decided to change their Apple-only policy and start developing on Android. I feel like they spend a lot of time talking about parts that aren’t relevant, though. They mention “fragmentation,” and then imply that “oh, now it’s fixed!”, when the truth is that there are still lots of tablets that Ticket To Ride will run on that aren’t one of the few mentioned in the article.

For the first time, I’m trying to put a lot of effort into social media. I’m posting on Facebook (which cross-posts to Twitter). I’ve updated my company blog. I’m posting on Google Plus, even, and starting to dig into other sites relevant to the game that I’m putting together. I’ve been on this project almost full time for days now, and not one line of code has been written for it.

Project in the works

After months of spending time at others’ beck and call, working on various consulting gigs, I’m finally back in the development chair. At least almost. I’ve spent over nine months working on contracts, refilling the war chest. I sold my house and bought a cheaper one to get out from under a mortgage, so I’d be better able to pursue my own projects for longer without active income. And I’m finally, finally pursuing my “dream game” project.

Edit on Jan 24, 2012: A new Lua binding generator now takes top honors. I write game libraries first, and then games. It’s in my blood, or at least I’m in a rut. One way or another, it’s a habit that I find hard to break. And I’ve become a major fan of the programming language Lua; it’s fast and small and easy to bind to C or C++. Or so I thought…

A while ago I wrote about the troubles I was having with Lua bindings. Some were too heavy, some were too flaky. And after spending all that time reviewing them, I ran out of time and had to pick one – and I made the mistake of picking a flaky one, with the result being that I have wasted a LOT of time over the past year fixing corner cases and issues with it.

On TechDirt today there is an article claiming that bloggers should be protected as journalists. But I tend to be more in agreement with Ars Technica on the topic, which notes the judge referenced more criteria than whether the “blogger” calls herself a journalist. As much as I want serious bloggers to be covered by shield laws, I do think that there should be some discretion into who is considered a journalist.